Archives for category: Flapper

As a writer, the Grog Dog has aspirations to literary greatness. This July 4, however, I dedicate my post to two all-American literary icons whose lasting fame and reputations are unmatched, and perhaps not coincidentally, are related by blood and name as well as writing prowess.

FSK-starspangled200-orgFrancis Scott Key, American lawyer, amateur poet, and coincidental observer of the Battle of Fort McHenry, authored the poem that would become the national anthem of the United States, “The Star-Spangled Banner“. During the War of 1812 (the “second war for independence”), the British attempted to re-establish dominion over the American colonies – and very nearly succeeded.

Not surprisingly, given the colonists’ tendency to produce and consume huge quantities of spirits, ale, and wine, Key set his poem to the tune of an English drinking song: “To Anacreon in Heaven“.

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F. Scott Fitzgerald

One hundred years later, Francis Scott Key’s second cousin three times removed and namesake, F. Scott Fitzgerald, would graduate from prep school and soon set out on a career as a writer – becoming famous for his talent and infamous for his dedication to a drinking lifestyle that rivaled his colonial ancestors’ in scope and frequency. By the time Fitzgerald had published his first novel, This Side of Paradise, in 1920, Prohibition had become law, and the post-World War I Jazz Age was blooming like the poppies in Flanders fields. Fitzgerald’s novel perfectly reflected – many say, influenced – the zeitgeist of the era and his own artistic (and hedonistic) circles. As a daring spokesmen for the Lost Generation, Fitzgerald enjoyed fame and fortune and squandered both in spectacular fashion. He was the first (1929) to conjugate “cocktail” as a verb (all the way through the preterit tense, whatever that is – the Princetonian smarty-pants).

fitzgerald-conguates-cocktail-openculture-comPresent: I cocktail, thou cocktail, we cocktail, you cocktail, they cocktail.

Imperfect: I was cocktailing.

Perfect or past definite: I cocktailed.

Past perfect: I have cocktailed.

Conditional: I might have cocktailed.

Pluperfect: I had cocktailed.

Subjunctive: I would have cocktailed.

Voluntary subjunctive: I should have cocktailed.

Preterit: I did cocktail.

So in honor of two American literary icons, whose very existence perfectly synthesized the foundational elements of the American character – drinking and a genius for pop culture that earned them long-lasting fame – I offer The Fitzgerald:

2 oz London dry gin

3/4 oz simple syrup

3/4 oz fresh lemon juice

2 dashes Angostura bitters

Shake with ice; strain into a cocktail glass. This bright, tart cocktail has a sweet, silky mouthfeel and a slightly bitter finish that makes this literature fan think sentimentally of the troubled author Fitzgerald’s life and times – so different from those of his ancestor but equally inherently American.

Black Dog Flag-Pinterest

Friday night is the GrogDog’s favorite unwinding night of the week – an ideal evening for themed drinking at home to kick off the weekend without incurring a large bar tab or a massive hangover. (Saturday is chore day, and chores aren’t nearly as much fun to do with a pounding head and roiling stomach.)

A booze hound, and young Joan Crawford

As a fan of the classic cocktail and longtime student of the Prohibition era (and the Jazz Age that preceded it), I have many recipes to build personal theme nights around, but I keep coming back to the Charleston – the drink, the dance, and the exuberant attitude that post-WWI America exported to the world.

The Charleston

The Charleston

The Charleston cocktail is 1 part London dry gin, 1 part kirsch, 1 part maraschino liqueur, 1 part sweet vermouth, and 1 part dry vermouth. Stir all ingredients with ice and strain into a cocktail glass.

While you’re enjoying your drink – from a cocktail glass or the flask tucked discreetly under your garter – put on a little hot jazz and try a few steps of the Charleston!

The Charleston

The Charleston

The Charleston is an energetic dance performed to a ragtime rhythm, made popular in the 1923 Broadway musical “Runnin’ Wild”. The Charleston is easy to learn and a fun way to work off the cocktail calories. (Fans of the 1959 film Some Like It Hot, set in the 1920s, will remember Marilyn Monroe performing the song “Runnin’ Wild” with band mates Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis, who perform in drag as part of the dance band Sweet Sue and Her Society Syncopators.)

Other popular 1920s dances included the Black Bottom and the Shimmy (or Shimmie). For some very danceable (modern) performances of popular Jazz Age songs, check out the Hot Sardines on iTunes. (You can get a taste of their style in this irresistible video.)

Rudolph Valentino as The Sheik

Rudolph Valentino as The Sheik

If you’re not feeling that energetic, stir up your Charleston cocktail and put on one of the era-defining movies that thrilled postwar audiences with daring dress, drinking, and debauchery, like The ‘It’ Girl starring Clara Bow, or The Sheik starring Rudolph Valentino. Both films (and many more silents and early talkies) have been nicely restored and are available for purchase or download.

So don’t be a Mrs. Grundy! Stir up some giggle water and make some whoopee some Friday night – creating your own 1920s cocktail theme night is the bee’s knees!

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