As a writer, the Grog Dog has aspirations to literary greatness. This July 4, however, I dedicate my post to two all-American literary icons whose lasting fame and reputations are unmatched, and perhaps not coincidentally, are related by blood and name as well as writing prowess.

FSK-starspangled200-orgFrancis Scott Key, American lawyer, amateur poet, and coincidental observer of the Battle of Fort McHenry, authored the poem that would become the national anthem of the United States, “The Star-Spangled Banner“. During the War of 1812 (the “second war for independence”), the British attempted to re-establish dominion over the American colonies – and very nearly succeeded.

Not surprisingly, given the colonists’ tendency to produce and consume huge quantities of spirits, ale, and wine, Key set his poem to the tune of an English drinking song: “To Anacreon in Heaven“.

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F. Scott Fitzgerald

One hundred years later, Francis Scott Key’s second cousin three times removed and namesake, F. Scott Fitzgerald, would graduate from prep school and soon set out on a career as a writer – becoming famous for his talent and infamous for his dedication to a drinking lifestyle that rivaled his colonial ancestors’ in scope and frequency. By the time Fitzgerald had published his first novel, This Side of Paradise, in 1920, Prohibition had become law, and the post-World War I Jazz Age was blooming like the poppies in Flanders fields. Fitzgerald’s novel perfectly reflected – many say, influenced – the zeitgeist of the era and his own artistic (and hedonistic) circles. As a daring spokesmen for the Lost Generation, Fitzgerald enjoyed fame and fortune and squandered both in spectacular fashion. He was the first (1929) to conjugate “cocktail” as a verb (all the way through the preterit tense, whatever that is – the Princetonian smarty-pants).

fitzgerald-conguates-cocktail-openculture-comPresent: I cocktail, thou cocktail, we cocktail, you cocktail, they cocktail.

Imperfect: I was cocktailing.

Perfect or past definite: I cocktailed.

Past perfect: I have cocktailed.

Conditional: I might have cocktailed.

Pluperfect: I had cocktailed.

Subjunctive: I would have cocktailed.

Voluntary subjunctive: I should have cocktailed.

Preterit: I did cocktail.

So in honor of two American literary icons, whose very existence perfectly synthesized the foundational elements of the American character – drinking and a genius for pop culture that earned them long-lasting fame – I offer The Fitzgerald:

2 oz London dry gin

3/4 oz simple syrup

3/4 oz fresh lemon juice

2 dashes Angostura bitters

Shake with ice; strain into a cocktail glass. This bright, tart cocktail has a sweet, silky mouthfeel and a slightly bitter finish that makes this literature fan think sentimentally of the troubled author Fitzgerald’s life and times – so different from those of his ancestor but equally inherently American.

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